Thu, Jun 17, 2004 - Page 3 News List

Legislator says new party should not be recognized

By Cody Yiu  /  STAFF REPORTER

Lisa Huang (黃文玲), an independent legislator, who is the daughter of former Central Election Commission chairman Huang Shih-cheng (黃石城), yesterday came out in opposition to the Non-Partisan Solidarity Union's (無黨團結聯盟, NSU) plan to register with the Ministry of Interior as a political party, saying that the group's name is not in accordance with its purpose.

"Since `non-partisan' means not sharing common political ideology, the public might become confused if such a name is permitted to be registered, as the name and the group's mission do not support one another," said Huang, who is an attorney.

Independent Legislator Su Ying-kuei (蘇盈貴) said that as an independent lawmaker, he had already been asked if he was part of the NSU.

"I was in a taxi today and the cab driver asked me if I was a member of NSU. It seems the public is perplexed about the group," Su said.

The NSU was formed yesterday when Chang Po-ya (張博雅), a former minister of the interior, assumed a position as chairwoman of the new party's preparatory committee.

The NSU's membership so far includes nine other members: independent Legislators Yen Chin-piao (顏清標), Tsai Hao (蔡豪), May Chin (高金素梅), Walis Pelin (瓦歷斯貝林) and Chen Chin-ding (陳進丁); former Chinese Nationalist Party (KMT) legislators Lin Pin-kun (林炳坤), Lu Shin-ming (呂新民); former People First Party (PFP) legislator Chiu Chuang-liang (邱創良); and former Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) legislator Cheng Yu-cheng (鄭余鎮).

Huang cited the Social Groups Registration Regulation (社會團體許可立案作業規定) in urging the ministry to reject the NSU's registration as a political party.

"According to this regulation, if a group's name, purpose and mission are not in accordance with one another, then the group's registration does not meet the stipulated procedural requirements," Huang said.

Huang also stated that the NSU is not in position to represent the majority of Taiwanese people who are not registered members of any political party.

"According to statistics, the total number of registered members of political parties comes to about 1.7 million, which is a small proportion of the population. Therefore, the NSU cannot be representative of all the rest," Huang said.

In response, the ministry's Department of Civil Affairs, which is in charge of political party registrations, stated that the ministry respects people's freedom of choice when it comes to selecting party names.

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