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The B-Flex Hi-Fi USB Speaker from JLab Audio.

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OWN A PSP, BUT TIRED OF SQUINTING?

Sony's PlayStation Portable, better known as the PSP, is a high-powered gaming console and multimedia player that fits in your pocket. But what if you don't want to watch a movie or play a game on a small 4 1/2-inch-wide screen?

The peripherals manufacturer Nyko will now let you hook your PSP up to your television with its Play on TV Adaptor.

To circumvent the lack of a video output on the PSP, the device clamps over the PSP screen and scans it like a video camera, sending the signal through standard cables to your TV.

Blowing up the tiny PSP screen to several times its original size does degrade the image. But the Play on TV does widen your PSP options.

If you have a movie in the PSP's UMD format, and the idea of holding the PSP in your lap for two hours to watch it doesn't appeal to you, the Play on TV offers a better way.

A HARD DRIVE IN YOUR POCKET THAT CAN UPDATE, ENCRYPT AND EVEN OFFER A REWARD

At first glance, Western Digital's Passport Pocket USB 2.0 is just another small external storage device. It is a bit bigger than many other USB drives, and it has a rotating connector so it can fit into tight or strangely angled slots. At about US$100 for 6 gigabytes, it handles lots of data at a low price.

But there are two crucial differences between the Passport Portable and its rivals. First, it's a hard drive, not flash memory. Western Digital is one of the oldest hard-disk manufacturers around, and like the other drive makers, it has learned how to miniaturize the drives while increasing capacity.

The other major feature of the drive is the bundled WD Sync software, which synchronizes specified files from your PC or Mac and keeps changes up to date while it is running. It even encrypts the files automatically, a good safety feature in case you lose the drive. A nice little wrinkle is that you can record your contact details and an offer of a reward for returning the drive. This will be the only data that is readable without the password.

IMPROVE COMMUNICATION WITH YOUR FEET

While the marriage of iPods and shoes might seem strange to some, die-hard runners and fans of Get Smart will be happy to know that their iPod Nano music player can now do more than just pump out the tunes: it can also talk to your Nikes.

The Nike+iPod, a partnership between Nike and Apple, consists of an attachment for the Nano and a sensor that fits into specially designed Nike shoes, sold separately.

The sensor wirelessly transmits speed and stride length to the Nano attachment, which plugs into the bottom of the player. Using special software, the Nano then becomes a training partner, providing time, distance and speed information on its color screen or via voice prompts piped through the headphones.

Once home, the Nike+iPod can connect to your PC or Mac and upload data about your run.

The kit, available online for US$30, works best with the Nike+line of shoes, which cost about US$100. The shoes have a small hole in the instep that cushions the sensor. The sensor itself weighs less than 28g, so you won't notice it during your wind sprints.

A PC WITH AN UNEARTHLY LOOK AND THE SPECS TO MATCH

The Alienware Area-51 7500 is the kind of computer that kicks sand in the face of wimpier PCs. Based on Intel's latest processor and motherboard — code-named Conroe for those who are keeping track — the 7500 has a processor speed of about 3 gigahertz, which means you'll be able to play blindingly fast games of Solitaire.

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