Court reduces sentence for Samsung group heir - Taipei Times
Tue, Feb 06, 2018 - Page 5 News List

Court reduces sentence for Samsung group heir

PERSONS OF INTEREST:Former South Korean president Park Geun-hye and her confidante, Choi Soon-sil, should be seen as the main players in the case, a court ruling said

AFP, SEOUL

A South Korean appeals court yesterday upheld Samsung heir Jay Y. Lee’s bribery conviction, but cut his prison sentence to a suspended term, ordering his immediate release.

Lee, the vice chairman of Samsung Electronics Co, the world’s biggest smartphone and memorychip maker, was convicted of bribery in connection with the sprawling corruption scandal that brought down former South Korean president Park Geun-Hye.

The 49-year-old was given five years in prison when his original trial concluded in August last year, making him the first Samsung chief to serve prison time, even though his father was twice convicted of criminal offenses and his grandfather was earlier embroiled in scandal.

He had been convicted of a range of offenses, including bribery, embezzlement, moneylaundering and perjury of parliament.

The case centered on payments Samsung made to Park’s secret confidante, Choi Soon-sil, with prosecutors arguing they were intended to secure government favors.

However, the appeals court yesterday struck out several of the convictions and reduced the penalty on the remainder to a suspended prison sentence of two-and-a-half years.

“Park Geun-hye and Choi Soon-sil should be seen as the main players in this scandal,” said the ruling, which was read out in court by one of the judges.

Four other Samsung Electronics executives convicted alongside Lee also had their convictions reduced, with the two who had been given prison terms similarly having their sentences suspended.

Since his father was left bedridden by a heart attack in 2014, Lee has been the de facto head of the sprawling Samsung group, by far the biggest of the family-controlled conglomerates known as chaebol that dominate Asia’s fourth-largest economy, with its revenues equivalent to about one-fifth of the country’s GDP.

This story has been viewed 1473 times.

Comments will be moderated. Remarks containing abusive and obscene language, personal attacks of any kind or promotion will be removed and the user banned.

TOP top