Thu, Sep 14, 2017 - Page 7 News List

FEMA: 25% of Florida Keys homes gone

RAVAGED ISLANDS:FEMA Administrator Brock Long said that basically every house in the island chain was affected by Irma, as the death toll in the state rose to 12

AP, LOWER MATECUMBE KEY, Florida

Mirta Mendez walks through the debris at the Seabreeze trailer park along the Overseas Highway in the Florida Keys on Tuesday.

Photo: AP / Al Diaz / Miami Herald

With 25 percent of the homes in the Florida Keys feared destroyed, emergency workers on Tuesday rushed to find Hurricane Irma’s victims — dead or alive — and deliver food and water to the stricken island chain.

As crews labored to repair the lone highway connecting the Keys, residents of some of the islands closest to Florida’s mainland were allowed to return and get their first look at the devastation.

Authorities allowed re-entry to the islands of Key Largo, Tavernier and Islamorada for residents and business owners on Tuesday.

The extent of the devastation took many of the first returnees by surprise.

“It’s going to be pretty hard for those coming home,” said Petrona Hernandez, whose concrete home on Plantation Key with 10.6m walls was unscathed, unlike others a few blocks away. “It’s going to be devastating to them.”

However, because of disrupted telephone service and other damage, the full extent of the destruction was still a question mark, more than two days after Irma roared into the Keys with 209kph winds.

At the end of Islamorada, roughly the halfway point of the Keys, police at a checkpoint turned around returning residents seeking to travel farther south and waved through utility crews, law enforcement and healthcare workers.

Elsewhere in Florida, life inched closer to normal, with some flights again taking off, many curfews lifted and major theme parks reopening.

Cruise ships that extended their voyages and rode out the storm at sea began returning to port with thousands of passengers.

The number of people without electricity in the steamy late summer heat dropped to 9.5 million — just under half of Florida’s population. Utility officials said it could take 10 days or more for power to be fully restored.

About 110,000 people remained in shelters across Florida.

The number of deaths blamed on Irma in Florida climbed to 12, in addition to four in South Carolina and two in Georgia. At least 37 people were killed in the Caribbean.

“We’ve got a lot of work to do, but everybody’s going to come together,” Florida Governor Rick Scott said. “We’re going to get this state rebuilt.”

In hard-hit Naples, on Florida’s southwest coast, more than 300 people stood outside a Publix grocery store in the morning, waiting for it to open.

A manager came to the store’s sliding door with occasional progress reports. Once he said that workers were throwing out produce that had gone bad; another time, that they were trying to get the cash registers working.

At the front of the line after a more than two-hour wait, Phill Chirchirillo, 57, said days without electricity and other basics were beginning to wear on people.

“At first it’s like: ‘We’re safe, thank God.’ Now they’re testy,” he said. “The order of the day is to keep people calm.”

While nearly all of Florida was engulfed by the storm, the Keys — home to about 70,000 people — appeared to be the hardest hit.

Drinking water and power were cut off, all three of the islands’ hospitals were closed and the supply of gasoline was extremely limited.

Search-and-rescue teams made their way into the more distant reaches of the Keys, and an aircraft carrier was positioned off Key West to help.

All 42 bridges in Monroe County, which includes the Keys, were deemed safe and one of two washed out sections of US 1 Roadway — the highway that runs through the Keys — was now navigable, the county said on its Twitter account.

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