Mon, Sep 02, 2013 - Page 7 News List

FEATURE: Memoto camera logs user’s entire life, shrugs off privacy to seize the moment

AFP, STOCKHOLM

When Martin Kaellstroem was a young adult, he lost both his parents to cancer. It became a spur for him to seize the day, as a person and an entrepreneur.

The result: A lens with no off-button that captures every moment of your life.

The 38-year-old co-founder of Swedish company Memoto is a man in a hurry as he promotes his “lifelogging” camera, which is worn with a clip on the shirt or on a string around the neck, and takes a picture once every 30 seconds.

“When you lose your parents, you realize that you don’t live forever. It has definitely affected me in my entrepreneurship. I can’t wait until later to fulfill my dreams, I have to live my dream now,” he said.

Some may see parallels with George Orwell’s 1984, the Truman Show or other dystopias. However, the team behind the Memoto camera insists that it does not breach any privacy. Rather, they see it as a way to collect memories.

“Traditionally, people only brought their camera to special events when everyone was dressed up, smiling into the camera,” Kaellstroem said. “But you don’t know in advance which moments will be important in the future. Perhaps you meet your future wife or witness an accident or a crime, pictures you might want to return to.”

Lifelogging, a technique for digitally gathering daily moments, is a growing phenomenon, gaining popularity with applications such as Saga, which creates info graphics summarizing your life through your smartphone data, and health trackers like Runkeeper and Moves.

Following the success of calling software Skype, music streaming service Spotify and video game developer Dice — all technologies with a heavy Swedish component — the next big thing could be a device logging your life in pictures.

The Memoto camera, which resembles an iPod mini, collects a stream of pictures, automatically sorted according to the GPS location, time and light. The “memory timeline” can be shared on social media.

It is a tool for a new tech-savvy world without the patience to keep a diary, according to co-founder Oskar Kalmaru.

“I’ve failed several times when trying to write a blog or travelogue. Older relatives managed to keep a diary over 20 years, but it is hard with the routine,” he said.

British lifelogging camera Autographer emerged in the medical field as a facilitator for Alzheimer patients, while GoPro and Looxcie are targeting practitioners of extreme sports.

Memoto will cater to both exhibitionists and nostalgic souls, according to Kaellstroem.

“There are two main types of users,” he said.

“The first category, to which I belong, is the collector who saves and organizes the memories, but only shares them with a small circle of close friends and family. The other group is more social, aiming to share a creative and active life through various social media platforms,” he added.

However, classmates, employees and neighbors may not want to be caught on film, much less people in witness protection programs or other sensitive areas of life.

Lifelogging does raise some privacy questions, says Steven Savage, a researcher at the Swedish Defense Research Agency, noting that the private sphere is relative: What is not offensive to one person might be to another.

“It depends where the photos end up,” Savage said.

“Today, it is difficult to search pictures, but new technology is being developed all the time. Once those pictures become searchable, more questions will arise. You’ll lose control over the situation,” he added.

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