Mon, Feb 06, 2012 - Page 7 News List

Police clear tents at Occupy DC site

MEDIA-FRIENDLY EVICTION:Police said they were not evicting the protesters, but the protesters call it a slow eviction and a lawyer will challenge the actions in court

AP, Washington

US Park Police arrest an Occupy DC movement protestor at McPherson Square on Saturday in Washington.

Photo: AFP

Dozens of US Park Police officers in riot gear and on horseback converged before dawn on Saturday on one of the last remaining Occupy sites in the US, with police clearing away tents they said were banned under park rules.

At least seven people were arrested. Officials said it was relatively peaceful, but got tense late in the day when an officer was struck in the face with a brick as police pushed protesters out of the last section of the park. The officer was taken to a hospital for treatment.

Protesters held a general assembly on Saturday evening and vowed to continue the movement. One of the speakers acknowledged the injured officer and urged everyone to practice nonviolence.

Dozens have been camped since Oct. 1 last year in McPherson Square, just blocks from the White House.

Similar to the New York protesters, who strategically occupied a park near Wall Street to highlight their campaign against economic inequality, the Washington group selected a space along K Street.

The street is home to some of the nation’s most powerful lobbying firms.

Police said that they were not evicting the protesters. Those whose tents conformed to regulations were allowed to stay, and protesters can stay 24 hours a day as long as they do not camp there with blankets or other bedding. Police threatened to seize tents that broke the rules and arrest the owners.

The police used barricades to cordon off sections of McPherson Square, a park under federal jurisdiction, and checked tents for mattresses and sleeping bags and sifted through piles of garbage and other belongings. Some wore yellow biohazard suits to guard against diseases identified at the site in recent weeks. Officials also have raised concerns about a rat infestation.

Eventually most of the protesters were pushed into the surrounding streets, which were closed to traffic.

By Saturday afternoon, seven were arrested, including four who refused to move from beneath a statue and three who crossed a police line.

Despite what police said, some protesters said the crackdown amounted to eviction.

“This is a slow, media-friendly eviction,” protester Melissa Byrne said. “We’re on federal property, so they have to make it look good.”

The officers poured into McPherson Square just before 6am, some on horseback and others wearing riot gear.

As a helicopter hovered overhead, they shut down surrounding streets and formed neat, uniform lines inside the park.

The police initially turned their focus to dragging out wood, metal and other items stored beneath a massive blue tarp — which protesters call the “Tent of Dreams” — that had been draped around a statue of Major General James McPherson, a Union general in the US Civil War in the 1860s. Protesters agreed to remove the tent.

Later, in a lighter moment, Park Police used a cherry-picker to remove a mask of 17th-century English revolutionary Guy Fawkes that had been placed on the statue.

Jeff Light, a lawyer who represents a couple of Occupy protesters and who was at McPherson Square, said he expected to challenge the police actions in court. He said he was frustrated because a lawyer for the government had said there were no plans to seize tents that complied with the regulations.

“Here they are,” Light said, “doing something different than what they said in court.”

The Washington demonstration is among the last remaining Occupy sites, enjoying constitutional protections guaranteeing freedom of speech and assembly rights by virtue of its location on federal park service property.

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