Wed, Apr 16, 2014 - Page 5 News List

FEATURE: Volunteer works to protect students

By Chen Wei-tzu and Jake Chung  /  Staff reporter, with staff writer

Apart from regular meals, supporters also sent mid-afternoon and midnight snacks, Tung said.

“The Sunflower movement taxed the will and determination of the students. I tried a little bit here and there to help liven up the atmosphere and make it easier for the students to maintain their protest,” he said.

He added that torrential rains that fell on some days had caused a number of students to pack up their things and head home, which led to him asking for donations for tents because he wanted the students to continue their protest, but did not want to see them suffer in the sun or rain.

“We received 10 tents, which we set up for the students so they could continue their sit-in protected from the ravages of nature,” Tung said.

In another effort to help enliven the atmosphere, Tung put up a tree made from bananas, arranged to look like a sunflower. The move was a silent rebuke of former Chinese Nationalist Party (KMT) legislator Chiu Yi (邱毅), who during a political talk show on TV pointed to photographs of the legislative chamber that showed the podium decorated with sunflowers and insisted that they were bananas.

Tung said he once had to ask donors — after receiving 5,000 lunch boxes — that instead of sending a lot of food at the same time, they should send their donations in batches because they would be easier to distribute and the food would last longer.

“The students are brave and going through hard times in order to achieve social justice, and I could only help them by staying with them,” Tung said, adding that he “hoped to become, along with other supporters, the guardians of these brave students.”

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