Fri, Aug 01, 2008 - Page 3 News List

Top US official denies arms 'freeze'

CONGRESS DISPLEASED Despite reassurances from the White House, seven representatives introduced legislation requiring the administration to provide 'detailed briefings'

Legislative Speaker Wang Jin-pyng answers a question at a press conference in Washington yesterday. Wang said that the US had not frozen arms sales to Taiwan and that it would continue the sales.

PHOTO: CNA

By Charles Snyder

Staff reporter in WASHINGTON

A top-level White House official, denying that the Bush administration has imposed a “freeze” on arms sales to Taiwan, on Wednesday reiterated the US’ commitment under the Taiwan Relations Act to help Taiwan in its defense needs.

Dennis Wilder, the National Security Council’s senior director for Asian affairs, told reporters: “We continue to live up to that commitment. There are many engagements between the United States military and [the] Taiwan military. Nothing has been frozen in this relationship.”

Wilder made the statements in response to a question during a briefing on US President George W. Bush’s trip to Asia, at the end of which Bush will attend the opening of the Olympic Games in Beijing next Friday.

Wilder’s comments came two days after he reportedly met with visiting Legislative Speaker Wang Jin-pyng (王金平), a meeting that led Wang to say he was very “optimistic” about the US position on arms sales, although he received no word as to when the sales would go through.

“There is no change in America’s policy toward Taiwan,” Wilder said at the briefing. “I think there has been a misunderstanding in the press that somehow we have put this relationship on hold. That is not true. We continue to have very robust relations with the Taiwan military. We continue to assist them with their self-defense needs and that is the policy of the United States Government.”

On the arms sales packages, which have been on hold since last December, allegedly to avoid China’s disfavor at a time when the administration needs Beijing’s help in a number of foreign policy crises, Wilder said: “There are many discussions that take place at various levels with the Taiwan military on their military needs. We are evaluating those needs and we will notify Congress of our decisions on various arms sales at the appropriate times.”

Bush will leave for Asia on Tuesday and visit South Korea and Thailand before arriving in Beijing on Thursday for a four-day visit.

As part of the trip, Bush will hold a meeting with Chinese President Hu Jintao (胡錦濤), but Wilder declined to say whether the arms sales would be an issue that would come up during the meeting.

Meanwhile, in an attempt to hold the Bush administration’s feet to the fire when it comes to its deliberations on the current arms sales issue, seven members of the US House of Representatives, including some of Taiwan’s most ardent friends on the Hill, introduced legislation on Wednesday to require the administration to provide Congress “detailed briefings” on its deliberations.

The bill reflects the displeasure among representatives over the Bush administration’s rumored freeze and its failure to keep Congress fully informed of its thinking on Taiwan arms sales, congressional staffers involved in the legislation said.

The bill would require the secretaries of state and defense to give the House Foreign Affairs Committee and the Senate Foreign Relations Committee “detailed briefings” on a regular basis on the issue, starting three months after the bill is enacted into law and every four months thereafter.

The bill would include any discussions between Taiwan and the administration and “any potential transfer” of weapons systems to Taiwan.

The bill’s author, Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, the ranking Republican member of the House committee, has been a powerful supporter of Taiwan in the committee and has taken on a greater role since the death of former chairman Tom Lantos earlier this year.

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