Mon, Nov 26, 2007 - Page 3 News List

MAC slams former UMC chairman over `peaceful' proposal

NOT AN OPTION Chen Ming-tong said Tsao envisioned enacting a law strikingly similar to the ideas in the PRC's `Anti-Secession' Law

STAFF WRITER. WITH CNA

Mainland Affairs Council (MAC) Chairman Chen Ming-tong (陳明通) yesterday slammed former United Microelectronics Corp (UMC) chairman Robert Tsao (曹興誠) for urging lawmakers to introduce legislation on a "cross-strait peaceful coexistence."

Chen said Tsao's vision was strikingly similar to the ideas laid out in China's "Anti-Secession" Law and was detrimental to the nation's identity and democracy.

Chen made the remarks in response to Tsao's front-page ad, published in Chinese-language newspapers this month, urging Democratic Progressive Party presidential candidate Frank Hsieh (謝長廷) and his Chinese Nationalist Party (KMT) rival Ma Ying-jeou (馬英九) to jointly promote such a law, which Tsao envisioned as a legal basis for maintaining freedom and democracy.

In his ad, Tsao proposed a law banning any referendum on independence on the basis that the nation is already independent.

Commenting on Tsao's suggestion, Chen said at a Taiwan Thinktank seminar that it was unthinkable to legislate a law that would let China hold a "unification referendum" but ban Taiwan from holding a referendum.

Chen said it was sad that Tsao envisioned legislation that would downgrade Taiwan's status from that of a sovereign nation to a "highly autonomous region" of China similar to Hong Kong or Macau.

Such a law violated the Constitution and would effectively be a "suicide law," Chen said.

Tsao's proposal echoes the "Anti-Secession" Law enacted by Beijing in March 2005, Chen said, adding that the "unification referendum" proposed by Tsao was tailor-made to the specifications of the Chinese law.

Chen said that the Republic of China is a sovereign state that now consists solely of Taiwan and is both de facto and de jure independent of the People's Republic of China.

This story has been viewed 2393 times.
TOP top