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Wild things: crackdown on menu for China’s animal eaters
掃蕩保護動物成餐桌佳餚 中國加重刑責

Vendors unload cages of animals for sale at Xingfu market in Conghua, in southern China`s Guangdong Province on Aug. 4, 2012.
販售員二0一二年八月四日在中國南方廣東省從化市的興富市場,卸下一籠籠待售的動物。

Photo: AFP
照片:法新社

Porcupines in cages, endangered tortoises in buckets and snakes in cloth bags — rare wildlife is on open sale at a Chinese market, despite courts being ordered to jail those who eat endangered species.

The diners of southern China have long had a reputation for exotic tastes, with locals sometimes boasting they will “eat anything with four legs except a table.”

China in April raised the maximum sentence for anyone caught selling or consuming endangered species to 10 years in prison, but lax enforcement is still evident in Guangdong Province.

“I can sell the meat for 500 yuan (US$80) per half kilo,” a pangolin vendor at the Xingfu — “happy and rich” — wholesale market in Conghua told AFP. “If you want a living one it will be more than 1,000 yuan.”

The market was the subject of a Chinese media expose two years ago, when a local official told the state-run Beijing Technology Times that its role as a center for animal trafficking was an “open secret.”

The seller, who declined to be named, said making a living from his creatures was getting tougher. “Now it’s governed very strictly,” he said.

On a recent morning traders were out in force, however, with hundreds of snakes writhing in white cloth bags and wild boars staring plaintively from wire cages.

Not all the produce is illegal but a huge sign touted giant salamanders, which are classed as critically endangered — one level below “extinct in the wild” — on the International Union for the Conservation of Nature’s Red List of threatened species.

Asian yellow pond turtles were up for sale beside porcupines, most likely from Asia where several species are also critically endangered.

Southern China has long been the center of a culinary tradition called “wild flavor,” which prizes parts of unusual wild animals including tigers, turtles and snakes as a route to health — despite the lack of orthodox scientific evidence proving such benefits exist.

Pangolins — scaly creatures which in the wild lick up ants with tongues longer than their bodies — are protected by the international wildlife trade treaty CITES, to which Beijing is a signatory.

In parts of China they are prized by new mothers hoping to produce milk and have become the focus of a vast smuggling industry stretching across Southeast Asia — estimated to traffic tens of thousands of the animals each year.

Beijing first enacted laws in 1989 forbidding trade in scores of creatures including the Chinese pangolin, but has long struggled to enforce the ban as a booming economy has boosted demand.

In April the country’s rubber-stamp parliament approved a new interpretation of the 1980s law which could see jail sentences of up to 10 years for those caught eating endangered animals, as well as for sellers.

Meanwhile, state-run media have publicized huge hauls of smuggled animals — with border police in Guangdong Province in May shown seizing 956 frozen pangolins, reportedly weighing four tonnes.

Jill Robertson, CEO of Hong Kong-based charity Animals Asia, described the enhanced penalties as a “positive step” but added that “enforcement must be strengthened, and public education and awareness greatly enhanced.”

(AFP)

籠裡豪豬、籃裡瀕臨絕種的陸龜與布袋裡的蛇—儘管法律明定吃保護動物是要坐牢的,但依然可見中國市場公開販售這些稀有野生動物。

中國南方饕客長久以來以享用奇特食材聞名,有時當地人甚至會以其「除了桌子不吃外,任何四隻腳的都來者不拒」而自豪。

中國在四月提高販賣或食用保護動物的刑期達十年,但在廣東省顯然執法不力。

一位從化市興富批發市場的穿山甲販子告訴法新社表示:「這肉我可以賣半公斤五百元人民幣(八十美元)。」他說:「若你要活的,價格將會超過一千元人民幣。」

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