Tue, May 28, 2013 - Page 15 News List

Merkel vows to avoid China trade war

HEATING UP:Germany is pushing for talks between China and the EU, which has proposed imposing an average 47 percent special duty on Chinese solar panels

AP, BERLIN

German Chancellor Angela Merkel, right, talks to Chinese Premier Li Keqiang, left, during a breakfast meeting in the Chancellery in Berlin, Germany, yesterday.

Photo: Reuters/Bundesregierung

German Chancellor Angela Merkel said on Sunday she would use her country’s economic clout to prevent the EU from imposing punitive tariffs on some Chinese products to avoid a trade war.

Germany will push for “very intense talks” between the EU and China to seek a negotiated solution as swiftly as possible, the leader of Europe’s biggest economy told visiting Chinese Premier Li Keqiang (李克強).

The European Commission, the 27-nation bloc’s executive arm, accuses China of pricing its solar panels and some mobile telecom devices too cheaply, thereby flooding the European market, distorting competition and hurting European manufacturers. Brussels has therefore proposed imposing an average 47 percent special duty on Chinese solar panels and it is continuing to look into the telecommunication sector.

Li sharply criticized the EU’s approach, saying through a translator that “it sends a wrong signal because we want to fight protectionism together.”

“We strongly oppose this decision,” he said, referring to the proposed solar panel tariffs. “We hope that the EU won’t use protectionist trade measures for such small a cause.”

The EU, the world’s largest economy, is China’s second-biggest business partner after the US, with a trade volume of about 430 billion euros (US$566 billion) last year.

The solar panel exports stand for about 7 percent of China’s total exports to the EU.

The European Commission is expected to make a decision on the anti-dumping investigation after consulting all interested parties by the end of the year.

“Germany will work for this to be resolved as quickly as possible because we don’t believe [tariffs] would help us very much,” Merkel said. “And that’s why we should very intensely use the next six months, and Germany will do everything to ensure that the talks will really advance.”

Li thanked Merkel, adding that China also hopes that talks between Beijing and Brussels will be able to avoid a trade standoff and yield “an amicable solution.”

Germany was the only stop in an EU member nation on Li’s inaugural trip abroad, in a sign that China seeks Berlin’s clout to influence the EU’s at times cumbersome decisionmaking progress. Li, who took office in March, at one point even said during the news conference with Merkel that he was aware that Germany cannot replace the European Commission.

China is the world’s largest producer of solar panels, exporting more than half of its output to Europe, totaling 21 billion euros in 2011.

The global solar panel market is suffering from overcapacity, which has led to stiff competition that has forced several European manufacturers out of business.

Still, Germany’s powerful industrial lobby groups oppose the discussed EU anti-dumping measures against China because they fear an escalating trade war that would dent the countries’ buoying business ties.

Li said the EU’s decision would not serve its interests and would harm China and others.

“It will put the [solar] sector’s development in Europe in danger, harm the interest of the European companies, the European consumers and the European industry,” he said.

China rejects the EU’s price-dumping allegations, but the problem is no novelty for Beijing. The US last year imposed punitive tariffs on solar panel imports after finding that China’s government was subsidizing companies that were flooding the US market.

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