Sun, Jan 13, 2013 - Page 14 News List

Digital health movement
in focus at CES

The world’s biggest technology show was filled with new gadgets to monitor fitness, detect health problems and find solutions to rare and common health issues

By Rob Lever  /  AFP, LAS VEGAS

Some use low-power Bluetooth-connected patches to transmit data to a smartphone, a godsend for Bastian Hauck, a competitive sailor with type 1 diabetes who attended CES to promote the Continua Health Alliance for mobile wellness.

Hauck said the Bluetooth patch he wears transmits to a smartphone and enables him to monitor glucose in real time, helping him determine the best eating and insulin intakes. He shares that information with other diabetics.

Treating diabetes, Hauck said, “is like a guessing game. You have to do it 24/7. There is no rest.”

Although he could write down his readings, the wireless app “makes it easier” and provides extra motivation by being part of a community battling the same disease.

NFL quarterback Matt Hasselbeck showed CES a new skullcap from a company called MC10 that can fit under the helmet of a football player or other athlete and measure the impact of a collision, in an effort to better deal with concussions and similar injuries.

“In the NFL, you get hit in the head a lot,” he said, adding that this is a major concern not only for professionals, but for youth sports.

“This doesn’t prevent a concussion, but it’s another set of eyes on the athlete,” Hasselbeck added. “Our hope is that we can change the culture.”

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