Tue, Jan 10, 2012 - Page 7 News List

Healthier eating could be key to help ADHD kids

AFP, Washington

The suspected role of zinc and iron deficiency deserves further study, while megavitamin therapy has not been proven to work and may even be dangerous in the long term, it said.

For many parents, simply paying more attention to feeding their kids a healthy diet, rich in fish, vegetables, fruit, legumes and whole grains, is likely to help.

“A greater attention to the education of parents and children in a healthy dietary pattern, omitting items shown to predispose to ADHD, is perhaps the most promising and practical complementary or alternative treatment of ADHD,” the study said.

Andrew Adesman, chief of developmental and behavioral pediatrics at Steven and Alexandra Cohen Children’s Medical Center of New York, who was not part of the study, said more research is needed into dietary treatments for ADHD.

“We have more questions than answers,” he said. “It is unfortunate that more research is not being done to examine the role of dietary interventions for the treatment of ADHD.”

“Since some of these nutritional interventions cannot be patented, drug companies are not willing to underwrite the costs of the needed research,” he said.

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