Sat, Feb 15, 2014 - Page 3 News List

Man ‘planning to attack’ Presidential building released

INTENTIONS:Prosecutors said that they would continue investigating whether the man was planning an attack or was just drunk on Thursday

Staff writer, with CNA

A man who allegedly planned to ram his car into the Presidential Office building was released yesterday after being questioned by Taipei prosecutors.

Prosecutors said they determined there was no need to detain the man, identified only by his family name, Lin (林), after finding that he may have violated drunk driving laws.

Lin was handed over to Taipei prosecutors on Thursday by police, who said they were told that Lin was considering an attack on the building.

Prosecutors said they would further investigate whether Lin actually had such intentions.

Taipei police said that they had received a tip that Lin, a New Taipei City (新北市) resident, planned to carry out the attack on Thursday after he filed a complaint against injustices he said he suffered while serving in the military more than 20 years ago.

Lin seemed to be slightly drunk when he arrived at the Military Injustice Petitions Committee after parking his car outside to make his case, police said.

He was taken away by police officers as he prepared to leave the premises, committee officials said.

Taipei police transferred Lin to prosecutors after a breathalyzer test showed that Lin might have driven his car while under the influence.

The incident came three weeks after a man ran his truck up the steps of the Presidential Office.

Meanwhile, the Presidential Office yesterday denied a Chinese-language media report that said President Ma Ying-jeou’s (馬英九) office met with police on Thursday to discuss several security proposals, including closing off the main road leading to the building.

Such a meeting was planned for the near future, but had yet to take place, the Presidential Office said.

It added that the authorities involved would take public convenience in consideration when discussing heightened traffic controls around the building to improve security.

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