Tue, Nov 12, 2019 - Page 13 News List

Yellowstone on the Tibetan plateau

As China moves forward with its plans to emulate the US national park system, how will it protect the ecosystem and local people?

AP, XINING, CHINA

Tibetan prayer flags are seen during a clear day in Angsai, an area inside the Sanjiangyuan region in western China’s Qinghai province.

Photo: AP

There’s a building boom on the Tibetan plateau, one of the world’s last remote places. Mountains long crowned by garlands of fluttering prayer flags — a traditional landscape blessing — are newly topped with sprawling steel power lines. At night, the illuminated signs of Sinopec gas stations cast a red glow over newly built highways.

Ringed by the world’s tallest mountain ranges, the region long known as “the rooftop of the world” is now in the crosshairs of China’s latest modernization push, marked by multiplying skyscrapers and expanding high-speed rail lines.

But this time, there’s a difference: The Chinese government also wants to set limits on the region’s growth in order to design its own version of one of the US’s proudest legacies — a national park system.

In August, policymakers and scientists from China, the US and other countries convened in Xining, capital of the country’s Qinghai province, to discuss China’s plans to create a unified park system with clear standards for limiting development and protecting ecosystems.

The country’s economy has boomed over the past 40 years, but priorities are now expanding to include conserving key natural resources, says Zhu Chunquan, the China representative of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature, a Switzerland-based scientific group.

“It’s quite urgent as soon as possible to identify the places, the ecosystems and other natural features” to protect, Zhu says.

EMULATING THE US

Among other goals, China aims to build its own Yellowstone on the Tibetan plateau.

Zhu serves on an advisory committee providing input on the development of China’s nascent national park system, expected to be officially unveiled in 2020. Chinese officials also have visited US national parks, including Yellowstone and Yosemite, and sought input from varied organizations, including the Chicago-based Paulson Institute and the Nature Conservancy.

The ambition to create a unified park system represents “a new and serious effort to safeguard China’s biodiversity and natural heritage,” Duke University ecologist Stuart Pimm says.

One of the first pilot parks will be in Qinghai, a vast region in western China abutting Tibet and sharing much of its cultural legacy. The area also is home to such iconic and threatened species as the snow leopard and Chinese mountain cat, and encompasses the headwaters of three of Asia’s great waterways: the Yangtze, Yellow and Mekong Rivers.

“This is one of the most special regions in China, in the world,” says Lu Zhi, a Peking University conservation biologist who has worked in Qinghai for two decades.

While construction continues at a frenzied pace elsewhere on the Tibetan plateau, the government already has stopped issuing mining and hydropower permits in this region.

But a key question looms over the project: Can China marry the goals of conservation and tourism, while safeguarding the livelihoods and culture of the approximately 128,000 people who live within or near the park’s boundaries, many of them Tibetan?

“China has a dense population and a long history,” Zhu says. “One of the unique features of China’s national parks is that they have local people living either inside or nearby.”

INVOLVING LOCALS

Yellowstone is widely considered the world’s first national park. After it was created in 1872, the US government forced the Native Americans who lived in the area to resettle outside the park boundaries, in keeping with the 19th-century notion that wilderness protection meant nature apart from people. But countries that attempt to establish park systems in the 21st century now must consider how best to include local populations in their planning.

This story has been viewed 5172 times.

Comments will be moderated. Keep comments relevant to the article. Remarks containing abusive and obscene language, personal attacks of any kind or promotion will be removed and the user banned. Final decision will be at the discretion of the Taipei Times.

TOP top