Fri, Jun 13, 2008 - Page 14 News List

[EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT]

Fire twirlers entertain the crowds at Peacefest, the annual music festival that takes place in Longtan, Taoyuan County.

PHOTO COURTESY OF KLOIE PICOT

Highlight

The fourth annual Peacefest is on tonight, tomorrow, and Sunday at the Kunlun Herb Gardens in Longtan, Taoyuan County. Over 50 expat and local bands and DJs are scheduled to perform, including Aboriginal singers Kimbo Hu (胡德夫) and Biung (王宏恩). This year the organizers are encouraging everyone to arrive on time to participate in the Peace Circle. Here’s how the circle works: at around dusk, the Dream Community’s Samba Drummers start to play. The organizers will direct everyone on the field by the stage into a circle, after which a guest from the Amis tribe sings an invocation song, followed by one to three minutes of silence. Once the music starts again, the circle starts to move. The Samba Drummers play again to signal the end of the circle. For the more details on Peacefest, see last Friday’s article on Page 13 of the Taipei Times.

Tonight from 7pm through Sunday at 5pm

Kunlun Herb Plant Tourism Garden (崑崙藥用植物園), 8-2, 1st Neighborhood, Kaoping Village, Lungtan Township, Taoyuan County (桃園縣龍潭鄉高平村一鄰8-2號)

Entrance is NT$700, NT$600 with a flyer; admission on Sunday is free. (Pick up flyers at The Wall, Emerge Live House, The Velvet Underground, Witch House, Riverside and Underworld in Taipei; ATT, Live House, and Join Us in Kaohsiung; 89K, Y-Pa, and the Pigpen in Taichung.) In case of rain, the event will be postponed to the following week. See the Peacefest Web site for details. On the Net:

www.hopingforhoping.com

Theater

Animal School (動物學校) is a children’s performance by New Cool Children’s Theater (牛古演劇團). Imagine a school in the middle of a verdant forest where the teachers possess special pedagogical powers and the students are free to follow their own creativity. Together, the animal students and animal teachers exist in a world free from the pressures usually associated with Taiwan’s educational system.

▲ Family Theater (台北市立親子劇場), 2F, 1 Shifu Rd, Taipei City (台北市市府路1號2樓)

▲ Tomorrow and Sunday at 10:30am and 3pm; tomorrow at 7:30pm

▲ Tickets are NT$250 to NT$650, available through NTCH ticketing

After Taiwan and Penghu were ceded to Japan under the terms of the Treaty of Shimonoseki and before the Japanese army arrived en masse, a group of officials and intellectuals proclaimed the short-lived Republic of Formosa (台灣民主國). One symbol of the new republic was a flag called the “yellow tiger on a blue ground flag” (藍地黃虎旗). The Seal of 1895 (黃虎印) is an opera based around the creation of the republic and the life of an officer assigned to protect the “yellow tiger seal” (黃虎印).

▲ National Theater, Taipei City

▲ Today and tomorrow at 7:30pm; Sunday at 2:30pm

▲ Tickets are NT$500 to NT$2,000, available through NTCH ticketing

Taiwan’s raucous legislature and zany television shows are some of the fodder for Mad in Taiwan (瘋狂年代), the latest work by Ping-Fong Acting Troupe (屏風表演班). The play within a play tells the story of a theater group that attempts to produce a musical that captures the spirit of Taiwan. The trope they eventually hit on is betel nut beauties.

▲ Chiayi Performing Arts Center (嘉義縣表演藝術中心) 265, Jianguo Rd Sec 2, Minhsiung Township, Chiayi County (嘉義縣民雄鄉建國路二段265號)

▲ Tomorrow at 7:30pm

▲ Tickets are NT$500 to NT$2,500, available through NTCH ticketing

Classical music

The King’s Singers 40th Anniversary Celebration Concerts (國王歌手40周年音樂會).

The British a cappella group is back in town with its inimitable arrangements. The program includes a musical history of the madrigal form, arrangements of European folk songs and the Suite for The Jungle Book. The second concert will include Celtic sounds, a salute to Broadway and arrangements of Brit pop.

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