Mon, Jul 02, 2007 - Page 3 News List

Premier Chang criticizes representative to Singapore as being politically biased

`DE-SINIFICATION' Hu Wei-jen was quoted as saying that he would resign from his post because he did not see eye to eye with the Democratic Progressive Party

By Shih Hsiu-chuan and Flora Wang  /  STAFF REPORTERS

Premier Chang Chun-hsiung (張俊雄) yesterday voiced his disapproval of the country's representative to Singapore, Hu Wei-jen (胡為真), for his recent criticism of government policies.

Officials stationed abroad represent the government, the public, government policy and the nation's dignity, which is something that can not be discounted, Chang said when asked about Hu.

`BIAS'

"Diplomats should not have a personal bias. This is a basic condition," Chang said.

In an interview with Singapore's Chinese-language Lianhe Zaobao published on Saturday, Hu said that he had decided to tender his resignation because he didn't see eye to eye with the Democratic Progressive Party's campaign of "de-sinification" and the removal of memorials dedicated to dictator Chiang Kai-shek (蔣介石).

But speaking to the Liberty Times (the Taipei Times' sister newspaper) later on Saturday, Hu denied saying that he would resign from his post.

TEMPORARY POST

Hu said the Ministry of Foreign Affairs had notified him in April that he would be replaced and that he felt he was serving as a temporary representative.

The Chinese Nationalist Party (KMT) presidential candidate, Ma Ying-jeou (馬英九), in a separate setting, voiced his support for Hu yesterday, saying he was expressing the feelings of many Taiwanese representatives stationed overseas.

`SIMILAR VIEWS'

"Over the past few years, similar views had been heard [from them] when we visited other countries," Ma said when asked by press for comments.

Ma said that the government's policies are constantly changing, adding that this was the reason why some of the nation's allies had lost faith in Taiwan.

CONFUSION

Ma said that the changes left the nation's diplomats having a hard time explaining government policy to other countries.

"They have great difficulty carrying out their job because what they promise our friends the previous day may be totally overthrown [by our government] the next day," Ma said.

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