Fri, Oct 20, 2006 - Page 3 News List

NCC shrugs off Cabinet's proposed amendment

By Shelley Shan  /  STAFF REPORTER

The National Communications Commission (NCC) yesterday said that the Cabinet's proposal to abolish the requirement that commission members be approved by legislators has no bearing on the operation of the commission.

The Organic Law of the National Communications Commission (國家通訊傳播委員會組織法) stipulates that each political party gets to recommend a candidate to serve at the commission.

The number of candidates each party can recommend is based on the percentage of its representation in the Legislative Yuan.

The nation's premier can only appoint candidates recommended by parties, and the decision has to be approved by the legislature.

The article has, however, been ruled unconstitutional by the Council of Grand Justices.

"The Cabinet has held many meetings regarding the formation of the commission," said NCC spokesperson Howard Shyr (石世豪) at its routine media briefing yesterday, "Not a single commission member was invited to attend those meetings," he added.

The commission, however, was willing to report to the Cabinet on its accomplishments over the last eight months, Shry said.

"We [the commission] do not have any proposal as to how we are going to respond to the decision," Shyr added. "As we have said before, the commission remains a constitutional institution based on the ruling, and the decisions it makes remain effective."

Shyr said the commission was "grateful" that the Cabinet specifically list stated in the amendment of the commission's organic law that the term of service of current commission members will not end until August 2008, when new legislators will be appointed.

"This shows that [the Cabinet] thinks there cannot be a vacuum in law enforcement" Shyr said.

NCC chairman Su Yeong-ching (蘇永欽) said earlier that all the commission members will resign by January 2008, when the new legislators are chosen.

The ruling from the Council of Grand Justice, on the other hand, allows the commission to continue its functions until December 2008.

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