Wed, May 18, 2016 - Page 7 News List

US penis transplant brings hope to others

AP, BOSTON

Patient Thomas Manning awaits surgery at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston on Monday.

Photo: AFP

A 64-year-old cancer patient has received the nation’s first penis transplant, a groundbreaking operation that might also help accident victims and some of the many US veterans maimed by roadside bombs.

In a case that represents the latest frontier in the growing field of reconstructive transplants, Thomas Manning of Halifax, Massachusetts, is faring well after the 15-hour operation last week, Massachusetts General Hospital said on Monday.

His doctors said they are cautiously optimistic that Manning would eventually be able to urinate normally and function sexually again for the first time since aggressive penile cancer led to the amputation of the former bank courier’s genitals in 2012. They said his psychological state would play a big role in his recovery.

“Emotionally, he is doing amazing. I am really impressed with how he is handling things. He is just a positive person,” Curtis Cetrulo, who was among the lead surgeons on a team of more than 50, said at a news conference.

Manning, who is single and has no children, did not appear at the news conference, but said in a statement: “Today, I begin a new chapter filled with personal hope and hope for others who have suffered genital injuries. In sharing this success with all of you, it is my hope we can usher in a bright future for this type of transplantation.”

The identity of the deceased donor was not released.

The operation is highly experimental — only one other patient, in South Africa, has a transplanted penis. However, four additional hospitals in the US have permission from the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS), which oversees the nation’s transplant system, to attempt the delicate surgery.

The loss of a penis, whether from cancer, accident or war injury, is emotionally traumatic, affecting urination, sexual intimacy and the ability to conceive a child. Many patients suffer in silence because of the stigma their injuries sometimes carry; Cetrulo said many become isolated and despondent.

Unlike traditional life-saving transplants of hearts, kidneys or livers, reconstructive transplants are done to improve quality of life. While a penis transplant might sound radical, it follows transplants of faces, hands and even the uterus.

“This is a logical next step,” said Taiwan-born Andrew Lee (李為平), chairman of plastic and reconstructive surgery at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

His hospital is preparing for a penis transplant involving a wounded veteran and Lee said this new field is important for “people who want to feel whole again after the loss of important body parts.”

Still, candidates face some serious risks: rejection of the tissue and side effects from the anti-rejection drugs that must be taken for life. Doctors are working to reduce the medication needed.

Penis transplants have generated intense interest among veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan, but they often require more extensive surgery since their injuries, often from roadside bombs, tend to be more extensive, with damage to blood vessels, nerves and pelvic tissue that also need to be repaired, Lee added.

The Department of Defense Trauma Registry has recorded 1,367 male service members who survived with genitourinary injuries between 2001 and 2013. It is not clear how many victims lost all or part of the penis.

A man in China received a penis transplant in 2005. However, doctors said he asked them to remove his new organ two weeks later, because he and his wife were having psychological problems.

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