Mon, Aug 03, 2015 - Page 5 News List

Japanese A-bomb survivors hand stories on

AP, KUNITACHI, Japan

A mushroom cloud rises moments after an atomic bomb was dropped on Nagasaki, Japan, on Aug. 9, 1945.

Photo: AFP

On a recent weekend, an 84-year-old survivor of the Nagasaki atomic bombing retraced his movements on a map: The inferno during his 20km walk home, the “black rain” of falling radioactive particles and how he felt sick days later.

His audience of eight listened intently, some asking questions and taking notes. They hope to tell his story to future generations after he is gone, to take their listeners to the scene on Aug. 9, 1945, the way Shigeyuki Katsura saw and felt it.

In a government-organized program in the western Tokyo suburb of Kunitachi, 20 trainees aged from their 20s to their 70s are studying wartime history, taking public speech lessons from a television anchor and hearing stories from Katsura and another Kunitachi resident who survived Hiroshima.

“It’s been 70 years since the bombings and we survivors are getting old. Time is limited and we must hurry,” said Terumi Tanaka, the 83-year-old head of a national group, the Tokyo-based Japan Confederation of A and H Bomb Sufferers’ Organizations.

In a way, they are going backward in this digital age, learning face-to-face from their elders in order to carry on a storytelling tradition. It is not unlike Kabuki actors inheriting their seniors’ stage names and performing their signature pieces.

The same stories may be in video and text on the Internet, but organizers feel that in-person storytelling adds an invaluable human touch.

The Aug. 6, 1945, atomic bombing in Hiroshima killed about 140,000 people from injuries and immediate effects of radiation within five months and another atomic bomb dropped on Nagasaki three days later killed 73,000 people. The death toll linked to the attacks and their radiation effects has since risen to 460,000 people, with the number of survivors declining to 183,000 people, according to the latest government statistics.

Most survivors live in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Katsura said about 20 survivors live in Kunitachi, but only a few, including himself, are healthy enough to make public appearances.

Tanaka, a retired engineering professor, survived Nagasaki, but lost five relatives there when he was 13 years old. He said it would be almost impossible for storytellers to describe the horrors as vividly as the survivors, but hopes their imagination, compassion and commitment to peace can make up for any shortfall.

High-school teacher Mika Shimizu, 32, hopes to do just that, by putting a survivor’s experience in language her peers and others as young as her students can relate to.

“Even if we hear the same story, the way each of us retell it would be different, because we all have different sensibilities,” she said.

Another trainee, Sachiko Matsushita, missed her chance to find out directly from her father, who hid his exposure in Nagasaki for most of his life and largely kept the story to himself. Initially she wanted to revisit her father’s path, but now is devoted to passing on Katsura’s.

“I’d much rather hear the stories directly from people and pass them on to people,” the 47-year-old company worker said.

Katsura was 14 when he and his schoolmates, put to work for the war effort, were delivering a cart filled with weapons parts fromoschool to a factory when the Fat Man plutonium bomb exploded over Nagasaki.

“Having witnessed what the man-made nuclear weapon did to humans, I must condemn it as absolutely wrong and the mistake should never be repeated,” he said.

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