Mon, Jan 06, 2014 - Page 5 News List

Typhoon brings unexpected relief to Philippine town

AFP, BASEY, Philippines

A bicycle transport driver cycles past the entrance of the Red Cross tent hospital in Basey, Philippines, on Dec. 24 last year.

Photo: AFP

A devastating typhoon that killed thousands of people in the Philippines has unexpectedly given young traffic accident victim Mario Renos hope that he could one day walk again.

Hit by a motorcycle while walking to school months before Typhoon Haiyan struck the central islands, the 13-year-old’s shrivelled legs are taking their first steps to recovery at a Red Cross tent hospital put up in Basey town.

“I want to go back to school,” said Renos, gritting his teeth as he held on to metal railings with both hands while trying to negotiate an improvised exercise stall made of lumber from typhoon-felled coconuts.

“There is no reason he can’t walk again,” Norwegian nurse Janecke Dyvi said as she coaxed the boy across.

Staffed by doctors and nurses from 10 European nations and offering its services for free, the US$1.6 million hospital has uncovered a huge unmet need on Samar Island, one of the country’s poorest regions.

Survivors of the ferocious winds and giant waves that flattened Basey’s coastal neighborhoods on Nov. 8 are now flocking by the thousands to the medical facility that locals have affectionately named the “Norwegian Hospital.”

And it is not just those injured directly by the typhoon who are feeling the benefits of such aid. Pitched beneath the damaged municipal gym, the hospital’s six air-conditioned tents have brought relief for a multitude of injuries including centipede bites, harelips, traffic accidents, strokes and burns, and other ailments and conditions unrelated to the typhoon.

It also successfully delivered the town’s first ever baby via caesarean section, Norwegian administrator Kjell Engkrog said.

Haiyan, one of the country’s deadliest natural disasters which left nearly 8,000 people dead or missing and 4.4 million others homeless, also wrecked Basey’s hilltop district hospital.

The temporary replacement is the same type as those put up by the Red Cross in conflict areas around the world, and is being deployed in the Philippines for the first time, Engkrog said.

It is part of the aid agency’s contribution to an international humanitarian effort that is evolving from meeting the survivors’ immediate needs, such as food and shelter, to addressing their longer-term issues.

UN agencies and international aid organizations are also involved in the effort across the disaster zone, which covers an area the size of Portugal.

Until Haiyan hit, the boy struck by a motorcycle in March last year had no access to a physiotherapist and his legs had atrophied because he was bedridden at home, forcing him to stop attending his fifth-grade classes, nurse Dyvi said.

Philippine Health Assistant Secretary Eric Tayag said the government acknowledges “problems concerning [health services] access in that area.”

The district hospital is to be rebuilt this year, but the authorities do not yet know when it will reopen, he said.

“While the rebuilding is taking place, it is important that temporary facilities are available so that basic health services are delivered,” Tayag said.

Nearly 4,000 patients have been treated in the Red Cross hospital since November last year, said Atishay Abbhi, spokesman for the Red Cross contingent at the disaster zone.

He said the aid agency has also built four water treatment plants across Samar, a region largely populated by coconut farmers and fishermen.

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