Fri, Dec 07, 2012 - Page 7 News List

Tanks deployed after Egyptian rioting

REBELLING WITH CAUSE:Tanks and armored vehicles were stationed at roads leading to the presidential palace after battles that left five people dead and 644 injured

AP, CAIRO

Protesters throw stones and shine laser pointers at supporters of Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi outside the presidential palace in Cairo on Wednesday.

hoto: Reuters

The Egyptian army deployed tanks outside the presidential palace yesterday following fierce street battles between supporters and opponents of Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi that left five people dead and more than 600 injured in the worst outbreak of violence between the two sides since the Islamist leader’s election.

The intensity of the overnight violence, with Morsi’s Islamist backers and largely secular protesters lobbing firebombs and rocks at each other, signaled a turning point in the two-week-old crisis over the president’s assumption of near-absolute powers and the hurried adoption of a draft constitution.

Opposition activists defiantly called for another protest outside the palace later yesterday, raising the specter of more bloodshed as neither side showed willingness to back down.

Morsi was in the palace yesterday conducting business as usual, according to a presidential official who spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to address the media.

Egypt has seen sporadic clashes throughout nearly two years of political turmoil after the ouster of former Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak. However, Wednesday’s street battles were the worst between Morsi’s supporters and followers and came after an implicit call by the Muslim Brotherhood for its members to go to the palace and evict anti-Morsi protesters who had camped out there.

Unlike Mubarak, Morsi was elected in June after a narrow victory in Egypt’s first free presidential elections, but many activists who supported him have jumped to the opposition after he issued decrees on Nov. 22 that put him above oversight and a draft charter was later rushed through by his Islamist allies despite a walkout by Christian and liberal factions.

Compounding Morsi’s woes, four of his advisers resigned on Wednesday, joining two other members of his 17-member advisory panel who have abandoned him since the crisis began.

Six tanks and two armored vehicles belonging to the Republican Guard, an elite unit tasked with protecting the president and his palaces, were stationed yesterday morning at roads leading to the palace in the upscale Cairo district of Heliopolis. The guard’s commander, Major General Mohammed Zaki, sought to assure Egyptians that his forces were not taking sides.

“They will not be a tool to crush protesters and no force will be used against Egyptians,” he said in comments carried by the official MENA news agency.

The situation was calm yesterday morning, with thousands of Morsi supporters camping outside the palace after driving away opposition activists who had been staging a sit-in there, prompting fierce street battles that spread to residential areas.

The violence began when the Brotherhood called on its members to head to the presidential palace to “defend legitimacy” and protect it against what a statement termed attempts by the opposition to impose its will by force. In response, thousands descended on the area, chasing away about 300 opposition protesters who had been staging a peaceful sit-in outside the palace’s main gate. Clashes later ensued with the two sides using rocks, sticks and firebombs.

State television quoted the Health Ministry as saying yesterday that five people were killed and 644 injured by beatings, gunshot wounds and tear gas inhalation.

Morsi, meanwhile, seemed determined to press forward with plans for a Dec. 15 constitutional referendum to pass the new charter. The opposition, for its part, is refusing dialogue unless Morsi rescinds the decrees giving him near unrestricted powers and shelves the controversial draft constitution, which the president’s Islamist allies rushed through last week in a marathon, all-night session shown live on state TV.

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