Sun, Aug 19, 2012 - Page 5 News List

Myanmar opens new probe into sectarian unrest

AFP, YANGON, MYANMAR

Kashmiri Dukhtaran-e-Millat (Daughters of the Nation) activists demonstrate during a protest in Srinagar on Friday. The demonstrators protested against sectarian violence on Rohingya Muslims in Myanmar.

Photo: AFP

Myanmar has set up a new commission to probe sectarian clashes that saw scores killed and displaced tens of thousands, members of the commission said, following intense scrutiny of its handling of the issue.

The nation’s authorities have faced heavy criticism from rights groups after deadly unrest between Muslim Rohingya and ethnic Rakhine Buddhists in western Rakhine state.

The 27 member commission, which includes religious leaders, artists and former dissidents, will “expose the real cause of the incident” and suggest ways ahead, state mouthpiece New Light of Myanmar said.

The newspaper said its remit is to establish the causes of the June violence, the number of casualties on both sides and recommend measures to ease tensions and find “ways for peaceful coexistence.”

In June, the government established a committee to investigate the sectarian strife. However, its findings, originally expected by the end of that month, were never released by President Thein Sein.

The regime also invited the Saudi-based Organisation of Islamic Cooperation, the world’s largest Muslim grouping, to visit the country in an effort to diffuse mounting outcry over the treatment of the Muslim Rohingya.

Official figures say some 80 people died in the initial spasm of violence, but rights groups say the toll is likely much higher — mainly on the Rohingya side.

The commission is expected to call witnesses and be granted access to the areas rocked by the violence, which saw villages razed and has left an estimated 70,000 people — from both communities — in government-run camps and shelters.

Thein Sein has overseen a series of reforms since the end of outright military-rule last year, but the Rakhine bloodshed cast a long shadow over those changes.

Myanmar’s government has rejected accusations of abuse by security forces in Rakhine, after the UN raised concerns of a crackdown on Muslims.

New York-based Human Rights Watch has accused Myanmar forces of opening fire on Rohingya during the June outbreak of unrest, as well as committing rape and standing by as rival mobs attacked each other.

Decades of discrimination have left the Rohingya stateless, and they are viewed by the UN as one of the world’s most persecuted minorities.

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