Fri, Apr 02, 2010 - Page 7 News List

World News Quick Take

AGENCIES

■CHINA

Executive held over cash

An executive at China Mobile, the world’s biggest mobile operator, has been detained after going missing with hundreds of millions of yuan, a report said yesterday. Li Xiangdong went missing “many days ago,” the 21st Century Business Herald said, citing unnamed sources. It was unclear how Li siphoned the money away from the company.

■AUSTRALIA

Top painting given away

Australia’s most expensive painting, a Sidney Nolan “Ned Kelly” work, was given away on Wednesday only days after setting the nation’s art record. The painting, titled First-Class Marksman, of Australia’s iconic outlaw sold at auction last Thursday for A$5.4 million (US$4.96 million). Less than a week later the previously anonymous buyer, the Gleeson O’Keefe Foundation, stepped forward and donated the painting to the Art Gallery of New South Wales in Sydney. Experts say the painting reached a staggering price because it was the only work in the Ned Kelly series that remained in private hands. The other 26 are at the Australian National Gallery in Canberra. Sidney Nolan is considered Australia’s most acclaimed artist.

■INDONESIA

Video shocks country

A video posted on the Internet of a toddler smoking, swearing and making lewd sexual gestures has shocked the country, reports said yesterday. The video appeared on YouTube on the weekend but was removed by the Web site on Wednesday for violating its terms of use, the Jakarta Globe daily reported. It showed a boy aged about four puffing on a highly toxic clove cigarette, blowing smoke rings and swearing with the encouragement of adults, who can be heard laughing in the background. Responding to questions from the adults, the child said he wanted to be a thief when he grew up and spend his money on prostitutes. He also said his favorite thing in the world was “vaginas.”

■Australia

Airliner damages tires

Qantas Airways was yesterday investigating an incident in which an Airbus A380 damaged tires on landing in Sydney, showering sparks and scaring passengers. Witnesses reported seeing flames and hearing a loud bang as flight QF32 touched down late on Wednesday, while media said two tires burst. No passengers were hurt. An airport worker told Sydney’s Daily Telegraph that he feared the worst when he saw the dramatic landing. “I thought there was a serious crash, there were sparks and flames shooting out everywhere,” he as said. “And the noise was deafening, like cannons going off. I really thought something catastrophic had happened.”

■NIGERIA

Car crashes into plane

A man crashed his car through security gates and into a parked commercial aircraft at an airport on Wednesday, federal aviation spokesman Akin Olukunle said. The man slammed his aging Audi sedan through two sets of gates guarded by the Nigerian Air Force at Margaret Ekpo International Airport in Calabar, Olukunle said. The car then rammed into a Boeing 737 operated by Arik Air, the country’s leading commercial airline. The aircraft was empty at the time of the collision and no one was injured, Olukunle said, though local newspapers claimed passengers for the plane’s Abuja-bound flight were already boarding. Olukunle said the man was immediately arrested and was in Air Force custody.

■GERMANY

Man readies for solar trip

A German adventurer is preparing to sail the world in what he says is the world’s largest solar-powered boat. The catamaran-style yacht sporting some 500m² of solar panels was put into the water on Wednesday in the northern city of Kiel. Skipper Raphael Domjan praised the “groundbreaking” step toward what he said would be the first ever world tour by a solar-powered boat, scheduled to start in April next year. The boat, built by the Knierim Yachtbau shipyard, is 31m long, 15m wide and 7.5m high.

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