Free Wi-Fi decisive in choosing hotels

TRAVEL HABITS::Taiwan was ranked second in terms of the percentage of tourists preferring to stay at hostels instead of hotels, next only to Brazil, a survey showed

By Shelley Shan  /  Staff reporter

Thu, May 17, 2018 - Page 4

Taiwanese tourists consider free Wi-Fi more important than room rates when choosing hotels for their overseas trips, a survey released by the travel Web site Expedia showed.

This year’s Airplane and Hotel Etiquette Study showed that Taiwanese tourists spend an average of 11 nights at a hotel, slightly lower than the global average of 14 nights, while German tourists topped the survey with 20 nights.

The survey found that 70 percent of overall respondents prefer to stay at international hotel chains.

Taiwan was ranked second in terms of the percentage of tourists preferring to stay at hostels instead, at 33 percent, next only to Brazil.

Hostels help tourists cut accommodation costs and give them the opportunity to make friends with tourists from other nations, Expedia said.

Overall, more than 90 percent of respondents said that room rates and location are the two most important search criteria when booking a hotel room, while a majority of respondents said they prefer hotels that offer a wide range of facilities at affordable prices.

More than 90 percent of respondents said they consider free Wi-Fi an important hotel facility, followed by refrigerators (78 percent) and free toiletries (78 percent).

Taiwanese tourists voiced similar preferences.

Overall, more than 60 percent of respondents said that they would be troubled if they find bedbugs in their room.

The top concern for nearly 70 percent of Taiwanese tourists was rooms smelling of cigarette smoke or other foul odors.

Overall, nearly 90 percent of respondents said they would ask to change rooms if their room was dirty, while 59 percent said they would ask to change rooms if they did not like their room, 51 percent said they would do so if the guests in the next room made too much noise or their room was close to a noisy public area, and 24 percent said they would request a new room if theirs was too hot or too cold.

The survey also asked respondents to name the worst kind of hotel guests.

Forty-five percent said they cannot stand parents who are inattentive to their children, followed by “hallway hellraisers” (41 percent), in-room revelers (41 percent), complainers (29 percent), partygoers (27 percent), bar boozers (27 percent), bickerers (20 percent), loudly amorous guests (19 percent), hot tub canoodlers (11 percent) and elevator chatterboxes (5 percent).

Sixty-two percent of Taiwanese respondents said they cannot stand inattentive parents, while 52 percent said they detest “hallway hellraisers.”

The survey, conducted online between Feb. 22 and March 19, polled 18,229 respondents from 23 nations.