Tue, May 29, 2012 - Page 2 News List

DPP asks for more on NCC nominees

KNOWLEDGE IS POWER:Information given on the four candidates was insufficient and showed the Executive Yuan’s vetting process was inadequate, lawmakers said

By Shelley Shan  /  Staff reporter

Democratic Progressive Party lawmakers in the legislature in Taipei yesterday display signs demanding that Integral Investment Holdings Group general manager Chen Yuan-ling, a nominee for the National Communications Commission, provide more personal data for a legislative review tomorrow.

Photo: Chien Jung-fong, Taipei Times

The legislature’s Transportation Committee yesterday decided to postpone the review of the four nominees for the National Communications Commission (NCC) until tomorrow after Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) legislators demanded more background information on the nominees.

The DPP legislators said the Executive Yuan should provide the biographies and work experience of the nominees as well as their financial statements for the past three years. They also wanted to know if any of the nominees had dual citizenship and see records of their leaving and re-entering the country.

The review of the four nominees was originally scheduled to begin on May 17. However, the meeting was boycotted by DPP lawmakers because one of the nominees, Integral Investment Holdings Group general manager Chen Yuan-ling (陳元玲), only submitted a one-page document for review.

The DPP legislators said they could not adequately review her qualifications based on such little information.

While Chen managed to provide more details for the meeting yesterday, she faced more questions and criticism from legislators.

DDP Legislator Kuan Bi-ling (管碧玲) said Chen Yuan-ling was also a board member of Integral Investment Holdings, which has investments in China.

Kuan said that Chen Yuan-ling should explain whether her husband was head of the company.

“We also want to know how she plans to prevent the entry of Chinese companies like Huawei Techologies Co Ltd, into Taiwan if she has a huge personal stake in China,” Kuan said.

Several countries, including the US, Australia and India, as well as the EU, have restricted the import of telecommunications equipment made by Huawei over national security concerns, though the Chinese manufacturer had said that the concerns were unproven and unfounded.

DPP legislators Pasuya Yao (姚文智), Ho Hsin-chun (何欣純) and Chen Ting-fei (陳亭妃) also said that the information provided by Chen Yuan-ling only raised more questions about her.

Ho and Chen Ting-fei said Chen Yuan-ling’s work experience had no dates, so they did not know if she had worked in a certain company for only a couple of months or for a substantial period of time.

Yao asked why Chen Yuan-ling said nothing about her activities between 2002 and this year.

DPP Legislator Tuan Yi-kang (段宜康) said he regretted the four nominees were being humiliated in public, but that the Executive Yuan was to blame.

“The situation shows that the Executive Yuan knows nothing about its nominees and the vetting procedure was too relaxed,” Tuan said.

Chinese Nationalist Party (KMT) legislators Lo Shu-lei (羅淑蕾) and Yang Li-huan (楊麗環) said the boycott denied other lawmakers their right to review the qualifications of the nominees.

“Rather than relying on cold numbers and statistics, why don’t we ask them [the nominees] in person? You can ask whatever they or even their families have done,” Lo said. “If you use the same reason to boycott the review, then the information you need would never be enough.”

Both parties reached a consensus after a negotiation that the review should be postponed until tomorrow after more information is provided.

KMT Legislator Lee Hung-chun (李鴻鈞), who presided over the meeting, said tomorrow’s review should proceed as planned, regardless of how much information about the nominees they receive by that time.

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