Wed, Jul 07, 2010 - Page 2 News List

Tourism Bureau unveils domestic travel campaign

By Shelley Shan  /  STAFF REPORTER

The Tourism Bureau yesterday encouraged the public to try its 100 recommended travel routes in Taiwan, adding that those posting their travel photos and stories on the bureau’s Web site may have a chance to win a car.

The event is part of the bureau’s campaign to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the Republic of China next year. The bureau named the event: Travel in Taiwan and Be Touched 100 Percent (旅行台灣感動100).

To prepare the list, the bureau solicited proposals from the public on their favorite travel routes in the nation. It then invited experts to choose 100 travel routes from those proposals and categorize them based on Taiwanese cuisine, shopping, culture, eco-tourism and six other major themes.

The Tourism Bureau’s chief secretary Wayne Liu (劉喜臨) said the bureau is focusing on domestic travel first.

“We hope that, from people’s stories, we can find something new to tell our international visitors,” Liu said, adding that the bureau will launch the same campaign for the international market in October.

To reward those sharing their travel stories, Liu said that photos or video clips uploaded to the campaign Web site (http://100.taiwan.net.tw) would accumulate points and could enter monthly drawings between next month and Dec. 5.

In December, the top 200 point-earners will be eligible to enter a draw for a car worth NT$800,000 and a travel fund of NT$30,000.

Meanwhile, the bureau unveiled a commercial for the campaign that will be aired on TV, Facebook, Youtube and in movie theaters.

The bureau also displayed a new music video to promote tourism in Japan and South Korea, featuring the Taiwanese boy band Fahrenheit (飛輪海) and South Korean actress Ku Hye-sun.

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