Later retirement linked to lower risk of Alzheimer’s 較晚退休的人得阿茲海默氏症機率較低

Thu, Aug 22, 2013 - Page 10

Workers who postpone retirement are less likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia known to affect the elderly than those who leave their jobs at age 60, a recent survey of nearly half a million European retirees shows.

The study looked at health and insurance records of more than 429,000 former workers in France and found that the risk of developing dementia declined with each additional year worked beyond an average retirement age, said Carole Dufouil, research director at INSERM, a French government agency in charge of the study.

“Our data show strong evidence of a significant decrease in the risk of developing dementia associated with older age at retirement, in line with the ‘use it or lose it’ hypothesis,” Dufouil said in a statement about the study.

INSERM, in findings presented at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Boston on Monday, found there was a 14 percent reduction in Alzheimer’s detection in workers who retired at age 65 over those who retired at 60.