Mon, Sep 03, 2018 - Page 9 News List

USING IDIOMS 活用成語

Another word, this time a simple verb and its derivative adjective, is “botch,” as in “to botch up” something or to do a “botched job.” These both mean to do a task badly, with unsatisfactory results.

The word “botch” comes from the late 14th century word bocchen, originally meaning “to repair” but later, by the 1520s, to mean “repair clumsily,” or “to spoil through unskillful work.”

Almost three millennia ago, in other words, a man in what is now China named Zhou Xu conspired to consolidate his rule, illegitimately gained, of the state of Wei, but thoroughly botched it up, and made a real pig’s ear of the whole affair.

(Paul Cooper, Taipei Times)

Well, you’ve made a real pig’s ear of that, haven’t you? I think you should start again.

(嗯,你真的是把它給搞砸了,難道不是嗎?我覺得你應該再重頭來過。)

Think carefully about how you’re going to do this. It’s important. You don’t want to botch it up.

(你要好好想想該怎麼進行這件事,這很重要。我們不希望把事情搞砸。)

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