Thu, Jan 11, 2018 - Page 14 News List

Trump’s checkup comes as chatter about his health lingers

By Darlene Superville  /  AP, Washington

Trump takes Crestor for his cholesterol, a low-dose aspirin for heart attack prevention, Propecia to treat male-pattern baldness and antibiotics for rosacea. The one-page letter stated Trump’s testosterone level, 441.6, was in the normal range, as were his PSA reading for prostate abnormalities and tests of his liver and thyroid.

SEDENTARY LIFESTYLE

Trump leads a largely sedentary lifestyle compared to his most recent predecessors, who ran, rode mountain bikes, played basketball or used exercise machines and lifted weights, and were significantly younger than him when they took office. Trump has said he gets most of his exercise from playing golf, which he does most weekends, driving a cart instead of walking from hole to hole.

Federal health guidelines urge people over age 65 who have no health conditions that would limit exercise to get about 2 hours a week of moderate activity, such as brisk walking, and to do some muscle-strengthening activities at least two days a week.

As for his diet, Trump enjoys fast food, steaks well-done and with ketchup, chocolate cake and double scoops of vanilla ice cream, and reportedly downs 12 Diet Cokes a day. In a series of interviews last year, Trump showed journalists how he summons a butler to bring him a soda by pressing a red button on his Oval Office desk. In a recent book, Let Trump Be Trump,’ former top campaign aides Corey Lewandowski and David Bossie described the four major food groups on Trump’s campaign plane as “McDonald’s, Kentucky Fried Chicken, pizza and Diet Coke.”

Democratic Representative Jamie Raskin of Maryland introduced a bill in April to create a commission that would study whether the president was mentally or physically unable to perform his duties. Democrat Zoe Lofgren of California followed in August with a resolution urging the vice president and Cabinet to have Trump undergo exams to assess his competence. Neither measure has advanced in Congress.

White House officials pushed back Monday against a report by the Axios news Web site that Trump has been starting his official days later and holding fewer meetings than earlier in his presidency. Spokesman Hogan Gidley said Trump “exhibits yeoman-like work every day in this job, whether it be up before dawn and up into the wee hours of the morning every day.”

On Tuesday, the White House made a point of opening Trump’s lengthy immigration meeting with lawmakers to reporters and TV cameras, a rare public look lasting nearly an hour at the president conducting a policy gathering.

Trump friend Chris Ruddy, head of the conservative news site NewsMax, says he does not know the details of Trump’s schedule but “the idea that he’s some sort of absentee president is ludicrous.”

Barbara Perry, director of presidential studies at the University of Virginia’s Miller Center, said, “There’s a long history in the presidency of presidents hiding their medical infirmities, both as candidates and as presidents.”

Grover Cleveland secretly had part of a cancerous jaw removed aboard a yacht in 1893 when he was said to be on a fishing trip. During the 1960 election, John F. Kennedy concealed that he suffered from a variety of conditions, including Addison’s disease, which he controlled with steroids and other drugs. Woodrow Wilson had a secret stroke.

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