Sun, Dec 30, 2012 - Page 12 News List

Fighting the good fight

By Damon Wake  /  AFP, ISLAMABAD

Demand for contemporary art among collectors in Pakistan is growing, particularly among the young, Pasha says, but shows sell 25 percent of the exhibits at most.

His architecture practice supports the gallery financially and Pasha said he was proud to have been able to maintain its commitment to progressive art without watering it down with more commercially friendly pieces.

“We knew the type of art that we wanted to show, which is not economically viable, if our architecture practice doesn’t subsidize it, it will not last,” he said.

“So it’s more madness, indulgence, a commitment that this is something that one must do. That’s how we survived and we still do.

“If we were going to be commercial maybe we would have changed direction and not shown art of this caliber, mixed it with folk and trinkets and all this.”

The overt oppression of Zia’s rule has long gone, but Pakistan remains a deeply conservative country where religious extremists seek to impose limits on culture.

Pasha says the fundamentalist religious movements are now inspiring artists.

“Now we have got another fuel to make art which is the ‘fundo’ label and the ‘terror’ label,” he said.

“A lot of work you see is coming out and in one kind or another it represents that.”

Qadir Jhatial, 26, whose debut exhibition opened recently at Rohtas, said a show at the venerable gallery was something to which all young artists aspired.

“Rohtas is really supporting young talent,” he told AFP. “In Pakistan definitely I will get good exposure, people will get to know my work.”

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