Sun, Apr 21, 2013 - Page 8 News List

[ LETTER ]

Coping with terrorism

A week ago, both the US and Taiwan experienced bomb threats. Fortunately, the bomb in Taiwan failed to explode. However, the bomb in the US did. The phrase “act of terror” soon caught the public’s attention and the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks and other bombings came to mind. As the news channels delved into the investigations, I started to worry about the aftermath of the bombing.

News broadcasts often illustrate how explosive devices are made. Bombs fashioned out of pressure cookers are easily made. You can build one in your kitchen. It’s cheap, easy and deadly. Illustrations, explosive powders and manuals are readily available on the Internet. The descriptions are clear, which makes me wonder if such bombs will be used in other attacks.

Events such as the explosions at the Boston Marathon, ricin in letters and explosions at fertilizer plants have a major impact. Images of such events are repeatedly broadcast into people’s homes, exaggerating fears and threats. Once a mood of fear and anxiety reaches a certain level, it might mutate into dissatisfaction with the government and destabilize society.

As the analysis of the Boston explosions moves toward the issue of security, police and security specialists signal a daunting fact — it’s impossible to make such sporting events safe, because they are open to public and are hard to secure.

These statements can be an incentive to commit a crime. The vulnerability of public security is uncovered and it must be addressed as soon as possible.

The aftermath of the explosion is not over yet. Publicity, retaliation and mass hysteria are what the terrorists crave. The media should refrain from repeatedly showing images of the explosion and instead focus on the love, strength and public concern over the victims.

Spreading love and care for society will eventually heal the wounds and bring stability to society.

Steven Kang

Taipei

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