Thu, Jan 10, 2013 - Page 9 News List

WMD led to rare accord

Intelligence showing Syrian troops mixing chemicals stoked fears among Israel, the US, Russia and other nations about the use of biological weapons in the ongoing civil war, leading them to put aside their differences and show a united front to Bashar al-Assad

By Eric Schmitt and David Sanger  /  NY Times News Service, WASHINGTON

“Let’s just say right now, it would be a relatively easy thing to load this quickly onto aircraft,” one Western diplomat said.

How the US and Israel, along with Arab states, would respond remains a mystery. US and allied officials have talked vaguely of having developed “contingency plans” in case they decided to intervene in an effort to neutralize the chemical weapons, a task that the Pentagon estimates would require upward of 75,000 troops. Yet there have been no evident signs of preparations for any such effort.

The US military has quietly sent a task force of more than 150 planners and other specialists to Jordan to help the armed forces there, among other things, prepare for the possibility that Syria will lose control of its chemical weapons.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu was reported to have traveled to Jordan in recent weeks and the Israeli media have said the topic was how to deal with Syrian weapons if it appeared they could be transferred to Lebanon, where Hezbollah could lob them over the border to Israel. However, the plans, to the extent they exist, remain secret.

US, Israeli and other allied officials remained fixed on this potential crisis, especially as the opposition appears to have gained more momentum, seizing several Syrian military bases and the weapons stored there, and have been closing in on Damascus, the Syrian capital.

In response, Syria has reached deeper into its conventional arsenal, including firing Scud ballistic missiles at rebel positions near Aleppo.

Over the past week, a new concern emerged: Syrian forces began shooting new, accurate short-range missiles believed to have been manufactured in Iran. None had chemical warheads, but their use showed that the military was now deploying a more accurate weapon than the notoriously inaccurate Scud missiles they have used in past attacks.

As the fighting has escalated, US and other allied officials have said that Syrian government troops have moved some of the chemical stockpiles to safer locations, a consolidation that, if it continues, could actually help Western forces should they have to enter Syria to seize control of the munitions or destroy them.

Syria’s chemical weapons are under the control of a secretive Syrian air force organization called Unit 450, a highly vetted outfit that is deemed one of the most loyal to the al-Assad government, given the importance of the weapons in its custody.

US officials said that some of the back-channel messages in recent weeks were directed at the commanders of this unit, warning them — as Obama warned al-Assad on Dec. 3 — that they would be held personally responsible if the government used its chemical weapons.

Asked about these communications and whether they have been successful, a US intelligence official said only: “The topic is extremely sensitive and public discussion, even on background, will be problematic.”

Allied officials say that whatever safeguards the Syrian government has taken, there remains great concern that the weapons could fall into the hands of Islamist extremists fighting the government, or the militant group Hezbollah, which has established small training camps near some of the storage sites.

“Militants who got their hands on such munitions would find it difficult to deploy them effectively without the associated aircraft, artillery or rocket launcher systems,” said Jeremy Binnie, a terrorism and insurgency specialist at IHS Jane’s Defense Weekly. “That said, Hezbollah would probably be able to deploy them effectively against Israel with a bit of help.”

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