Fri, Dec 02, 2011 - Page 9 News List

Lack of employment fuels income inequality

The ever-widening gap between rich and poor has become a very thorny issue across the globe, but the differences in income can be significantly reduced by creating job opportunities for the poor and the uneducated

By Andres Velasco

Illustration: Mountain People

“Do you feel it trickle down?” ask the protesters occupying Wall Street and parts of financial districts from London to San Francisco. They are not alone in their anxiety. Income inequality is a top concern not only in tent cities across the US, but also among street protesters in Taipei, Tel Aviv, Cairo, Athens, Madrid, Santiago and elsewhere.

Inequality almost everywhere, including China, has become so extreme that it must be reduced. Protesters, experts and center-left politicians agree on this — and on little else. The debate about inequality’s causes is complex and often messy; the debate about how to address it is messier still.

In the rich countries of the global north, the widening gap between rich and poor results from technological change, globalization and the misdeeds of investment bankers. In the not-so-rich countries of the south, much inequality is the consequence of a more old-fashioned problem: lack of employment opportunities for the poor.

In a forthcoming book, University of Chile economist Cristóbal Huneeus and I examine the roots of inequality in Chile and elsewhere in Latin America and come away with three policy prescriptions: jobs, jobs, jobs. In the last quarter-century, Chile managed to consolidate democracy, triple per capita income and achieve the highest living standards in Latin America, with near-universal coverage in healthcare, education and old-age pensions. Yet the gap in the labor incomes of rich and poor has barely budged.

In Chile and elsewhere, discussions of inequality tend to focus on how much people earn. According to national household surveys, a Chilean worker earning the minimum wage takes home US$300 a month, while a professional in the top 10 percent of the income scale typically makes about US$2,400 a month. -However, that eight-fold gap is only the tip of the inequality iceberg.

It also turns out that the poor worker lives in a household where only 0.5 people on average have a job, so that two families are needed for one steady source of income. By contrast, in the upscale professional’s household, nearly two people on average hold down a job.

Add to this several other differences — above all, poorer families’ higher fertility rates — and the sums reveal that the top 10 percent of households actually make 78 times more (on a per capita basis) than those at the bottom. That is the kind of figure that keeps Chile ranked high globally in terms of inequality, despite the country’s other achievements.

Put differently: Not only take-home pay, but also employment opportunities can be unequally distributed. Compound the two problems and you have world-class income disparities. Chile is hardly alone in this category. South Africa, another country that is proud of its exemplary -transition to democracy, suffers from the same problem in an even more extreme version. Within Latin America, Colombia and Brazil, among others, face a similar combination of low employment and high inequality.

The main victims of this state of affairs are women and the young, for whom employment ratios are much lower than for the population as a whole. A typical poor household in Chile and elsewhere in Latin America is headed by a woman with only primary-school education. She has small children, limited access to day care and few job opportunities.

This story has been viewed 2876 times.
TOP top