Sun, Feb 18, 2018 - Page 5 News List

Cyberattacks could get worse: US report

AFP, WASHINGTON

A woman enters the four-story building known as the “troll factory” in St Petersburg, Russia, on April 19, 2015. The US government has claimed that the Internet Research Agency started interfering in US politics as early as 2014, extending to the 2016 presidential election, saying the agency was funded by St Petersburg businessman Yevgeny Prigozhin.

Photo: AP

Cyberattacks cost the US between US$57 billion and US$109 billion in 2016, a White House report said on Friday, warning of a “spillover” effect for the broader economy if the situation worsens.

A report by the White House Council of Economic Advisers sought to quantify what it called “malicious cyberactivity directed at private and public entities” including denial of service attacks, data breaches and theft of intellectual property, and sensitive financial and strategic information.

It warned of malicious activity by “nation-states” and specifically cited Russia, China, Iran and North Korea.

The report expressed particular concern over attacks on so-called critical infrastructure, such as highways, power grids, communications systems, dams and food production facilities which could lead to important spillover impacts beyond the target victims.

“If a firm owns a critical infrastructure asset, an attack against this firm could cause major disruption throughout the economy,” the report said.

It added that concerns were high around cyberattacks against the financial and energy sectors.

“These sectors are internally interconnected and interdependent with other sectors as well as robustly connected to the Internet, and are thus at a highest risk for a devastating cyberattack that would ripple through the entire economy,” it said.

The report offered little in the way of new recommendations on improving cybersecurity, but said the situation is hurt by “insufficient data” as well as “underinvestment” in defensive systems by the private sector.

The document was issued a day after US officials blamed Russia for last year’s devastating “NotPetya” ransomware attack, calling it a Kremlin effort to destabilize Ukraine which then spun out of control, hitting companies in the US, Europe and elsewhere.

It said Russia, China, North Korea and other states “often engage in sophisticated, targeted attacks,” with a specific emphasis on industrial espionage.

“If they have funding needs, they may conduct ransom attacks and electronic thefts of funds,” the report said.

However, threats were also seen from “hacktivists,” or politically motivated groups, as well as criminal organizations, corporate competitors, company insiders and “opportunists.”

In an oft-repeated recommendation, the White House report said more data sharing could help thwart some attacks.

“The field of cybersecurity is plagued by insufficient data, largely because firms face a strong disincentive to report negative news,” the report said. “Cyberprotection could be greatly improved if data on past data breaches and cyberattacks were more readily shared across firms.”

This story has been viewed 2108 times.

Comments will be moderated. Keep comments relevant to the article. Remarks containing abusive and obscene language, personal attacks of any kind or promotion will be removed and the user banned. Final decision will be at the discretion of the Taipei Times.

TOP top