Sun, Jan 27, 2013 - Page 14 News List

Iconic Empire State Building dazzles rivals with new lights

After years of being eclipsed by its Manhattan neighbors, the famous Art Deco building has been given a new lease on life with 1,200 newly installed LED lamps

By Sebastian Smith  /  AFP, NEW YORK

The lights of the Empire State Building illuminate the fog on Jan. 16 in New York.

Photo: AFP

When owner Anthony Malkin found his Empire State Building’s dominance of the New York skyline under attack, he turned to Hong Kong for an idea that could dazzle any rival into submission: light.

The 1,200 newly installed lamps now illuminating the skyscraper’s famous spire have brought the most visible change to the Art-Deco building since it was raised over Manhattan at the start of the Great Depression.

The spire — the same one that King Kong climbed in the black and white 1933 movie — had been lit up in some manner since 1956, with colors introduced in 1976.

In a nightly city tradition, New Yorkers would find the spire either in standard white or honoring some special event: blue and white when the Yankees win the Baseball World Series, red and green for Christmas, green for Saint Patrick’s Day, and so on.

However, the huge, inefficient lamps installed in the 1970s — each the size of a small table — left only a dull glow on the spire.

And the so-so performance was apt for an iconic building struggling for relevancy in a competitive age.

PAST GLORY

Downtown, the new World Trade Center was rising on the ruins of the Twin Towers, last year reclaiming its crown as New York’s tallest building.

Nearby at Penn Station, plans were hatched for a new skyscraper that would crowd in on the splendidly isolated position of the Empire State Building.

Also uncomfortably close, the Bank of America tower has become one of a growing gang of Midtown interlopers with their own sky-high light displays.

Malkin knew the centerpiece of his family’s real estate holdings, which he calls “the world’s most famous office building,” could not live on past glories.

“The biggest wake-up moment for me came in 2004 when I went with my older son’s class trip to China,” he said in an interview in the lavishly restored lobby of the Empire State Building.

“We found ourselves in Hong Kong and Shanghai, and I looked at that landscape and that skyline and I came back to New York and I said, wow, we are behind the times — not just the Empire State Building, but the whole skyline of New York,” he said.

The dream of putting some Hong Kong into King Kong’s spire was born.

It took until last year before the technology, using LED lights, evolved enough, particularly in the power of the basic white. However, the result was spectacular.

Where the Empire State Building once loomed discreetly over the twinkling Manhattan nightscape, today’s spire is an all-singing, all-dancing pillar of light, which technicians can program to almost any combination imaginable.

Instead of the 500 old clunkers, the new barrage of LED lamps “throw” light up the spire, reaching further, with greater intensity, and using an amazing 73 percent less electricity, said Jeremy Day, an engineer with Philips Color Kinetics, which installed the system.

“If you can verbally describe to me what you want your lights to do, we can probably find a way to program it,” Day said, showing off the new installation on a narrow balcony that runs around the 72nd floor.

Before the new system’s debut at the end of November last year, a team of workers would have to climb daily out to the lights and insert the correct filters ahead of nightfall.

Stacks of the huge colored disks have been left gathering dust alongside battered-looking former lights on the 72nd floor. No one has to go out in the snow and rain carrying the antiquated objects anymore: a click of the mouse from the building’s main computer room downstairs controls every single one of the 1,200 LEDs.

This story has been viewed 1386 times.
TOP top